Hi,

 

I am Max. You can call me Purple Max.

 

Purple is the colour that seems to repeat in many aspects of my life so far; Epilepsy, Scouts and my organic home-grown vegetables.

 

I have many other interests so thank you for visiting my website - it means a lot to this young teen (i.e. it's good to get your encouragement and feedback)

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Purple haircut all the way to Oz
Dr imtiaz and the author of their book for gift of the givers
Max being interviewed by Jannice Griever from intellilab Big Bites he was the youngest biz owner ent
Max age 13 on TV with prof Modi head of Neurology Sabc 3
What is epilepsy Midrand Reporter
Max age 12 interviewed by GOOD TV from Finland about his epilepsy work they asked him what makes you
Bryneven thank you
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What is Purple Day?

 

Purple Day for Epilepsy (Purple Day) is held each year on March 26 and is a day dedicated to raising awareness about epilepsy.

Purple Day is an international grassroots effort dedicated to increasing awareness about epilepsy worldwide. On March 26th annually, people in countries around the world are invited to wear purple and host events in support of epilepsy awareness. Last year, people in dozens of countries on all continents including Antarctica participated in Purple Day!

How did Purple Day start?

Purple Day was founded in 2008 by nine-year old Cassidy Megan of Nova Scotia, Canada.

 

Cassidy told her friends about her epilepsy after a presentation at her school by the local epilepsy association. At first, Cassidy was afraid the other children would make fun of her, but then she came up with the idea of Purple Day, where people would wear purple to show support for those living with epilepsy. 

Purple Day is named after the internationally recognised colour for epilepsy, lavender. The colour lavender represents isolation and solitude which is what many people living with epilepsy feel.

 

Why does Purple Day matter?

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, affecting 1 in 100 people in South Africa and 50 million people worldwide.  Despite its prevalence, epilepsy is often misunderstood and people with epilepsy can face social stigma and discrimination.

Epilepsy can be associated with profound physical, psychological and social consequences, and has an impact on a person's quality of life due to the unpredictability of seizures as well as the stigma associated with the condition.

People with epilepsy have an increased risk of poor self-esteem, depression and suicide.

Epilepsy can also affect an individual's education and employment opportunities, their ability to drive and most notably, their independence.

Purple Day helps epilepsy organisations in South Africa and around the world increase awareness, reduce stigma and empower individuals living with epilepsy to take action in their communities.

Purple Day reminds everyone that people living with epilepsy need understanding and acceptance, and deserve comprehensive care and access to innovative treatment options to effectively manage their disorder. Spreading the word about epilepsy will help dispel myths and remind people affected by seizure disorders that they are not alone.

Adding South Africa to the global Purple Day fraternity

Max ("Purple Max") has been raising epilepsy awareness from an early age of 9. He had been working as a volunteer at REEA Foundation (previously REEA Epileptic Care Centre), for over 5 years . REEA is a non-profit organisation caring for adults living with epilepsy and mil mental disorders who cannot be accommodated in a normal family environment.

What started out initially as a 1st German Scouts project turned into an international awareness campaign for epilepsy. Max has featured in many articles, including an international article for Epilepsy Australia.

How can you participate?

  • Wear purple on March 26 and encourage others to do the same

  • Hold an awareness or fundraising event (or you can join my event...)

  • Attend an official Purple Day event (like this one)

  • For more ideas visit Cassidy's website or Reea's locally

"I want people to know that if you have epilepsy, you aren't alone."

Cassidy Megan, Founder of Purple Day

"I want people to know that if you have epilepsy, you aren't alone."

Cassidy Megan, Founder of Purple Day

"Purple Day helps epilepsy organisations in South Africa and around the world increase awareness, reduce stigma and empower individuals living with epilepsy to take action in their communities."

REEA Foundation

"A big thank you to all of the Purple Day partners, donors, and supporters who have helped make Cassidy’s dream a reality, while promoting epilepsy awareness across the globe. We could not have done it without you."

Cassidy Megan, Founder of Purple Day

0 DAYS TO THE EVENT
World Purple Day for Epilepsy 2018 (South Africa Event)
Wear PURPLE on Sunday, 25 March 2018 & join the PURPLE WALK! Entrance is FREE but you are invited to bring toiletries for donation to: - Tshimollo Childrens Home, Kaalfontein - Bathabeleng Childrens Home, Ivory Park - Reea Epilepsy Care Centre, Craighall Park - Epilepsy SA, Geduld
When
Mar 25, 2018, 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Where
Mushroom Farm Park,
Sandown, Sandton, 2031, South Africa
Can you make it?
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